TechneTrain, Inc.
  About Us      OSHA News       Our Products      TechneTrain Articles     Contact Us     Useful Websites

TechneTrain Articles for the Surface Fabrication Industry

OSHA’s New Silica Regulation Deadlines Are Rapidly Approaching OSHA recently issued new rules to improve protections for more than 2 million workers exposed to respirable silica dust. These rules are expected to curb lung cancer, silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and kidney disease in America’s workers by limiting exposure to respirable crystalline silica that can become trapped in lung tissue and pose lifelong heath consequences. The first deadline for meeting the requirements of the new silica regulations will be in effect on Sept. 23, 2017...

OSHA’s New Silica Regulation and What it Means to Surface Fabrication Shops On March 24, 2016, OSHA announced a final rule to improve protections for more than 2 million workers exposed to respirable silica dust. Manufacturing, finishing, and installing natural and manufactured stone countertops generate dangerous crystalline silica dust that can become trapped in lung tissue and pose lifelong heath consequences...

Final OSHA GHS Deadline Approaching The final regulatory deadline for the new Hazard Communication Standard is radidly approaching. If you use even one hazardous chemical in your workplace, this affects you!

What's OSHA doing in the Surface Fabrication Industry A look at the most common areas hazard citations have been issued over the past year.

2015 OSHA Deadlines Some new regulatory deadlines are upon us, so heads up. OSHA’s revised injury and illness recordkeeping and reporting rules are in effect now! The agency says it will be enforcing these rules immediately—no grace period. The second OSHA deadline for the revised Hazard Communication Standard is also approaching.

Managing Scrap Metal Safely  Scrap doesn’t just represent a cost to a metal stamper that didn’t fully maximize raw material when processing a job. It also represents the potential for costs resulting from injuries if the scrap is handled or stored improperly...

What you need to know - and tell your employees - about the new Hazard Communication Standard for chemicals  It's time to update your chemical safety  (Hazard Communication/Right-to-Know) program. Classification and labeling of chemicals have changed to conform to the Global Harmonization System (GHS), and you need to train your employees on those changes this year.

Obama Administration brings more OSHA enforcement, expansion plans  The tone at the Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and health Administration has changed in the Obama era. More emphasis and resources are being allocated to enforcement. Inspections, penalties and fines are being increased...

Building a Safety Program for your Business Suface Fabricators need safety programs to protect their workers and to satisfy OSHA requirments. Any accident or citation can cost your business...

OSHA Clarifies General Duty Clause With a new administration focused on increased OSHA inspections and the enforcement of safer workplaces, it is a good time to review your safety program and ensure it is ironclad. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) has recently published a new Field Operations Manual (FOM) which tells OSHA officials how to conduct inspections and set fines. This manual also clarifies the General Duty Clause, which is the catch-all for safety issues in the workplace not covered by specific standards. 

OSHA Steps it Up  The tone has changed in the OSHA Administration and efforts to ramp up and crack down are already in motion. More resources are being allocated to enforcement, and penalties and fines are being increased. Now is a good time to review your safety program and ensure that it is iron-clad. Here is a brief overview of some of OSHA’s recent and planned actions.

Safety Update: OSHA Announces Fit-test Procedures. Fabricators may be required to use respirators to protect themselves from inhaling fumes, particles or dust when cutting, grinding, welding, coating or painting...

What's OSHA doing in the Surfacing Industry? Five things to watch out for in your shop  In October, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) published its citation information for the past year.  Now is a good time to look at what OSHA has been focusing on in your industry, and to evaluate your own safety programs.

Revisions to respiratory protection OSHA recently made changes to its Respiratory Protection Standard.  By answering 6 FAQs regarding respirators, you will be better equipped to implement or update an existing respiratory program...

The ABCs of OSHA Compliance A successful safety program is your legal obligation under the Occupational Safety and Health Act.  But what exactly does OSHA say you need to do and where do you start?

Protecting Your Employees and Your Business  Protecting your employees and protecting the bottom line for your business go hand in hand.  Every injury that is prevented saves money, in terms of workers' compensation claims and premiums, and in increased employee comfort, which leads to increased productivity and reduced turnover.  A successful safety program is also your legal obligation under the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

Slab Handling Unfortunately, handling and transporting rock slabs can be hazardous.  Each slab can weigh from hundreds to a few thousand pounds.  An average truck load can weigh between 20,000 and 40,000 pounds.  In response to a number of worker injuries and fatalities, OSHA has just released a safety and health information bulletin regarding the hazards associated with the handling and transporting of rock slabs.

OSHA Issues Bulletin on Dump Truck Bed Hazards  Accidents related to the unintentional movement of dump truck beds have resulted in deaths.

Keep on truckin' - Operating and maintaining a forklift truck safely  Lack of safe operating procedures and safety rule enforcement, as well as insufficient or inadequate training, lead to tens of thousands of injuries each year. Safe forklift practices through proper use, adequate maintenance, sufficient clearing for travel, and correct load stability are the best way to prevent these injuries...

Locking In Safety Assessing the work environment, creating programs, and training staff to abide by those programs are the keys to maintaining a safe work environment and avoiding steep fines, worker injury, or death...

Hispanic Worker Safety  There are approximately 17.5 million Hispanic workers in the U.S., and these workers have vital roles in virtually every American Industry.  The responsibility for providing a safe and healthful workplace for all employees rests squarely on the shoulders of every employer.  Employers face some specific challenges when it comes to the safety of Hispanic workers, particularly in the bilingual training area...

Teen Worker Safety  It is an unfortunate fact that children do get injured, and even killed, in the workplace.  Approximately 80% of teens are employed at some point before they leave high school.  The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health estimates that over 210,000 American children suffer occupational injuries every year, and over 70,000 of these injuries are serious enough to warrant emergency room treatment.  Teens are consistently injured at higher rates than adults, even though they are restricted from the most hazardous jobs...

Working in Hot Weather Working in hot weather is a fact of life for many employees. Strenuous physical activities in high temperatures and humidity have a high potential for inducing heat stress and subsequent illness among exposed workers.  It is the responsibility of the employer to understand all risks associated with the work environment and to ensure that employees understand these risks and comply with safe work practices...

Common Sense Tips for Ladder Safety Ladders can be a source of occupational injuries. Many minor accidents involve only cuts, bumps and bruises, but some result in broken bones, paralysis, or even death. Common problems include poorly maintained ladders, unsafe usage, and incorrect positioning. Fortunately, most ladder hazards can be avoided by taking common sense precautions that are also required by Federal OSHA regulations...

Get with the Program - Part 1  Building a Safety Program for your Business...This is the first in a series of four articles on building a safety program in the solid surface fabrication industry.  Injury risk factors present in the solid surface fabrication industry include manual lifting, use of hand tools and machinery, noise exposure, heat and sharp edge exposure, working in awkward postures, exposure to vibration, and chemical and dust exposure. These factors will vary in each business.  At a minimum, you likely need safety programs for personal protective equipment, chemical exposure, ergonomics, machine guarding, noise exposure, electrical safety and flammable materials. The following articles will focus on OSHA safety programs for some of these hazards common to the solid surface industry. 

Get with the Program - Part 2 Personal Protective Equipment...This is the second in a series of four articles on building a safety program in the solid surface fabrication industry.  PPE, or personal protective equipment, is clothing and equipment worn to protect you from workplace hazards. It is used to shield your body from any material or task that could hurt you through physical contact, absorption, or inhalation. Employers must provide and ensure that employees wear PPE when necessary. PPE must be appropriate for the work to be performed. When employees provide their own protective equipment, it is the employer’s responsibility to assure its adequacy, maintenance, and sanitation.

Get with the Program - Part 3 Hazard Communication...This is the third in a series of four articles on building a safety program in the solid surface fabrication industry.  OSHA's hazard communication standard requires evaluation and communication of all chemical hazards at the workplace. Each employee who works with or around hazardous chemicals must receive information about those chemicals through a comprehensive training program. Hazard communication programs are also commonly referred to as “right-to-know” program.  The primary chemicals used in surface fabrication include. 

Get with the Program - Part 4 4 Equipment Safety...This is the fourth in a series of four articles on building a safety program in the solid surface fabrication industry. This article covers your equipment safety program, including machine guarding, lockout/tagout, and electrical safety. 

Slings Get Noticed  In the surfacing industry, cranes and hoists are often used to aid in the movement of large materials or products.  These types of equipment typically use slings to hold their suspended loads.  Improper use of slings can lead to sling failure or load slippage, which in turn can lead to injuries or death along with property damage.  OSHA recently issued a new guide on the selection and use of slings for handling and moving materials.

OSHA Issues Rule Clarification on Employer Responsibilities for Employee Personal Protective Equipment  Virtually all surfacing shops require personal protective equipment (PPE) for their employees in some form or another.  Typically, safety eyewear, protective gloves and footwear, hearing protection and some type of respiratory protection, ranging from a dust mask to a full respirator, are required.  Some shops may also require uniforms or caps used to cover or protect employees’ clothing.  The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently announced a new rule clarifying employer responsibilities regarding payment for PPE.

 

Click here to see OSHA news that affects the Surface Fabrication Industry

Links              Contact Us

TechneTrain, Inc. 140 Wooster Pike Milford OH 45150 (800) 852-8314